Conference Year

2016

Hospital/Entity

Baptist Hospital

Category of Abstract

Research

Presentation Title

Assessment of Parental, Coach, and Athlete Knowledge of Sport Related Concussions in Children Participating in a Youth Football League.

Abstract

Background and Purpose: The recent attention placed on athletes who have experienced concussions and the long term effects of concussions in the NFL has put the issue in the national spotlight. CDC (2011) reported an estimated 2,651,581 children aged < 19 years were treated annually for sports and recreation-related injuries between the years of 2001-2009, with 173,285 (6.5%) of the injuries resulting from a traumatic brain injury.

In 2012 the state of Florida passed House Bill (HB) 291 (2012) known as “The Concussion Bill”. The purpose of HB-291 is to mandate protections for youth athletes who are exhibiting concussion like symptoms. In response to community needs Baptist Health participated in a prevention program for the South Miami Grey Ghost youth football league by providing specialized helmets, impact testing on players, and concussion awareness through education. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the concussion education program provided to Grey Ghost parents, coaches, and athletes.

Methods: A pre/post test comparison study of concussion knowledge among a convenience sample of parents, coaches, and athletes, participating in the Grey Ghost Youth Football league concussion education program.

Results: A total of 22 adults consisting of parents and coaches participated in the pre/post test. A paired t-test indicated that there was a significant increase in post-survey scores when compared to pre-survey scores on knowledge of concussions among parents and coaches (Paired t-test=-3.491, df=19, p=.002). Thirty five youth athletes also participated in the pre/post test. A Wilcoxon signed ranks test indicated that there was a significant increase in post-survey scores when compared to pre-survey scores on knowledge of concussions among participating youth (Z=5.059, p<.000).

Conclusions: Comparison of pre/post test results indicated that the 1-hour educational program was effective at increasing parent, coach and youth knowledge of concussions (definition, signs and symptoms and interventions).

Objective of Presentation

Describe the severity of concussion related injuries in youth athletes.

List key educational components of a concussion educational program.

Summary of Presentation

This presentation demonstrates the effectiveness of a one hour concussion educational program on parent, coach, and athlete concussion knowledge.

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Assessment of Parental, Coach, and Athlete Knowledge of Sport Related Concussions in Children Participating in a Youth Football League.

Background and Purpose: The recent attention placed on athletes who have experienced concussions and the long term effects of concussions in the NFL has put the issue in the national spotlight. CDC (2011) reported an estimated 2,651,581 children aged < 19 years were treated annually for sports and recreation-related injuries between the years of 2001-2009, with 173,285 (6.5%) of the injuries resulting from a traumatic brain injury.

In 2012 the state of Florida passed House Bill (HB) 291 (2012) known as “The Concussion Bill”. The purpose of HB-291 is to mandate protections for youth athletes who are exhibiting concussion like symptoms. In response to community needs Baptist Health participated in a prevention program for the South Miami Grey Ghost youth football league by providing specialized helmets, impact testing on players, and concussion awareness through education. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the concussion education program provided to Grey Ghost parents, coaches, and athletes.

Methods: A pre/post test comparison study of concussion knowledge among a convenience sample of parents, coaches, and athletes, participating in the Grey Ghost Youth Football league concussion education program.

Results: A total of 22 adults consisting of parents and coaches participated in the pre/post test. A paired t-test indicated that there was a significant increase in post-survey scores when compared to pre-survey scores on knowledge of concussions among parents and coaches (Paired t-test=-3.491, df=19, p=.002). Thirty five youth athletes also participated in the pre/post test. A Wilcoxon signed ranks test indicated that there was a significant increase in post-survey scores when compared to pre-survey scores on knowledge of concussions among participating youth (Z=5.059, p<.000).

Conclusions: Comparison of pre/post test results indicated that the 1-hour educational program was effective at increasing parent, coach and youth knowledge of concussions (definition, signs and symptoms and interventions).