Conference Year

2016

Hospital/Entity

Mariners Hospital

Category of Abstract

Evidence Based Practice

Presentation Title

Quality of Life of Patients with Diabetes

Abstract

Diabetes is a chronic and progressive disease that can influence quality of life. Treatments for diabetes which include medications, diet, and exercise are burdensome to people with diabetes (PWD).

In patients with diabetes, does Diabetes Education improve their perception of quality of life?

To explore the effects of diabetes education on patients’ perception of quality of life.

The “Living with Diabetes” (LWD) questionnaire was developed which focuses on self-management skills and patient perceptions regarding diabetes self-care. The LWD is based upon recommendations from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) 7 Self-Care Behaviors.

The LWD Questionnaire was administered during the first office visit and again at the end of the education program. The questionnaire has 15 questions and uses the Likert items ( Agree, Unsure, Disagree). LWD questionnaire was used for 10 months. The tool was developed by our Diabetes Educators.

In total, 86% (n=22) who completed the questionnaire felt improvement of their perception regarding diabetes self-care. Fourteen percent (n=3) felt no improvement or still working on their self-care skills. Majority of these patients achieved 100% (n=19).

In total, 86% (n=22) who completed the questionnaire felt improvement of their perception regarding diabetes self-care. Fourteen percent (n=3) felt no improvement or still working on their self-care skills. Majority of these patients achieved 100% (n=19).

The LWD tool is simple to administer and focuses on self-management skills and patient perceptions regarding diabetes self-care. These findings clearly acknowledged the importance of diabetes self-management education. The shift of feelings of self-inadequacy to adequacy and hopefulness is a positive transition.

Objective of Presentation

1. To validate and acknowledge the importance of diabetes education towards improvement of patient's diabetes self-care and feelings of adequacy.

2. To empower clinicians to create new tools and solutions to improve care and share with others.

Summary of Presentation

Diabetes is a complex disease and can be a burden to most individuals with diabetes.Every person is unique and as a diabetes educator, the Living with Diabetes questionnaire provides a multidimensional perspective from the patient regarding the physical and emotional burden of the daily diabetes management. This tool helps diabetes educators to develop with the patient an individualized education and coping skills to improve their quality of life.

Full Text of Presentation

wf_yes

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Quality of Life of Patients with Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic and progressive disease that can influence quality of life. Treatments for diabetes which include medications, diet, and exercise are burdensome to people with diabetes (PWD).

In patients with diabetes, does Diabetes Education improve their perception of quality of life?

To explore the effects of diabetes education on patients’ perception of quality of life.

The “Living with Diabetes” (LWD) questionnaire was developed which focuses on self-management skills and patient perceptions regarding diabetes self-care. The LWD is based upon recommendations from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) 7 Self-Care Behaviors.

The LWD Questionnaire was administered during the first office visit and again at the end of the education program. The questionnaire has 15 questions and uses the Likert items ( Agree, Unsure, Disagree). LWD questionnaire was used for 10 months. The tool was developed by our Diabetes Educators.

In total, 86% (n=22) who completed the questionnaire felt improvement of their perception regarding diabetes self-care. Fourteen percent (n=3) felt no improvement or still working on their self-care skills. Majority of these patients achieved 100% (n=19).

In total, 86% (n=22) who completed the questionnaire felt improvement of their perception regarding diabetes self-care. Fourteen percent (n=3) felt no improvement or still working on their self-care skills. Majority of these patients achieved 100% (n=19).

The LWD tool is simple to administer and focuses on self-management skills and patient perceptions regarding diabetes self-care. These findings clearly acknowledged the importance of diabetes self-management education. The shift of feelings of self-inadequacy to adequacy and hopefulness is a positive transition.