Conference Year

2016

Hospital/Entity

Baptist Health South Florida - Corporate

Category of Abstract

Research

Presentation Title

Increasing RN Perceived Competency with Substance Use Patients

Abstract

Millions of adults visit U.S. hospitals each year because of substance use and behavioral disorders (SAMHSA, 2013). While health care providers in medical-surgical, emergency, and critical care units are trained to treat acute illness, injury and disease, knowledge of behavioral disorders and other conditions related to mental health may vary greatly among individual providers. There is evidence that negative attitudes among health professionals towards patients with substance use disorders are widespread and contribute to marginalized health care for these patients (Kelleher, 2007; McCaffery et al., 2005; van Boekel, Brouwers, van Weeghel, & Garretsen, 2013). The purpose of this study was to increase the perceived competency of nurses caring for patients with behavioral and substance abuse through an educational intervention. A two-hour interactive class was developed and a quasi-experimental design comparing results from a pre-education questionnaire to a post-education questionnaire on perceived competency was conducted. Pre- and post-education data was collected from 57 nurses. Immediately following the educational intervention, there was a statistically significant increase perceived competency related to self-confidence, attitudes, communication, and knowledge of resource availability among participating nurses. Nurses working in acute care hospitals, particularly those without addiction and psychiatric services, may benefit from continuing education on this important topic.

Objective of Presentation

Summarize the problem of substance use patients in the acute care population in terms of the nurses who are not prepared to care for them.

Investigate the possibility of an educational intervention as a means of increasing the acute care nurse's perceived competency in caring for substance use patients.

Summary of Presentation

This presentation is designed to demonstrate that a brief educational interventional can increase the acute care nurse's ability to provide quality care to the substance use patient. A review of the literature offers insight into how the survey competency statements were developed and how they relate to the purpose, objectives, and content of the educational program. We will summarize the participant reactions to the class as well as our results in the hope of encouraging nurse educators to pursue and expand research on the topic.

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Increasing RN Perceived Competency with Substance Use Patients

Millions of adults visit U.S. hospitals each year because of substance use and behavioral disorders (SAMHSA, 2013). While health care providers in medical-surgical, emergency, and critical care units are trained to treat acute illness, injury and disease, knowledge of behavioral disorders and other conditions related to mental health may vary greatly among individual providers. There is evidence that negative attitudes among health professionals towards patients with substance use disorders are widespread and contribute to marginalized health care for these patients (Kelleher, 2007; McCaffery et al., 2005; van Boekel, Brouwers, van Weeghel, & Garretsen, 2013). The purpose of this study was to increase the perceived competency of nurses caring for patients with behavioral and substance abuse through an educational intervention. A two-hour interactive class was developed and a quasi-experimental design comparing results from a pre-education questionnaire to a post-education questionnaire on perceived competency was conducted. Pre- and post-education data was collected from 57 nurses. Immediately following the educational intervention, there was a statistically significant increase perceived competency related to self-confidence, attitudes, communication, and knowledge of resource availability among participating nurses. Nurses working in acute care hospitals, particularly those without addiction and psychiatric services, may benefit from continuing education on this important topic.