Conference Year

2016

Hospital/Entity

Homestead Hospital

Category of Abstract

Research

Abstract

The mortality rate for sepsis in the US exceeds those for common cancers. It has been identified that patients who are admitted from the regular nursing floor to the ICU with sepsis have a statistically significant higher mortality rate and hospital length of stay than those patients admitted directly to the ICU. This research echoes the findings within BHSF. Early identification and aggressive treatment are primary goals in the treatment of sepsis in preventing septic shock. The medical surgical nurse must be empowered to take action when faced with a decision how to manage the septic patient. The use of a sepsis screening tool, along with the initiation and implementation of an initial management bundle is important in decreasing patient mortality rates. We will conduct a quasi-experimental pre and post intervention via an educational session for the medical surgical nurse as well as a retrospective chart review to compare the mortality outcomes of those patients identified as having sepsis.

Data collection is through surveys and retrospective chart reviews. Research questions include: 1. Does the implementation of an evidenced based educational intervention increase medical-surgical nurses’ knowledge of early sepsis identification on post-test when compared with pre-test? 2. “Does the implementation of an evidenced based educational intervention increase the rate of “code rescue” initiation for sepsis intervention at 3 months post education when compared to 3 months pre-education?”, 3. “Does the implementation of an evidence based educational intervention on early sepsis recognition for medical-surgical nurses, decrease the rate of patients with severe sepsis on medical surgical units?”

Objective of Presentation

The participant will understand the differences in mortality rates in patients with sepsis coming from the medical surgical floors vs. the emergency department.

The participant will recognize the importance of early identification and treatment in the patient with sepsis.

Summary of Presentation

The medical surgical nurse lacks knowledge in the management of patients with sepsis. Through this educational intervention, the nurse will have greater understanding of sepsis and act more aggressively to obtain timely treatment for the patient.

Full Text of Presentation

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Open Access

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Sepsis Education for the Primary Nurse with Swift Intervention leads to Successful Outcomes.

The mortality rate for sepsis in the US exceeds those for common cancers. It has been identified that patients who are admitted from the regular nursing floor to the ICU with sepsis have a statistically significant higher mortality rate and hospital length of stay than those patients admitted directly to the ICU. This research echoes the findings within BHSF. Early identification and aggressive treatment are primary goals in the treatment of sepsis in preventing septic shock. The medical surgical nurse must be empowered to take action when faced with a decision how to manage the septic patient. The use of a sepsis screening tool, along with the initiation and implementation of an initial management bundle is important in decreasing patient mortality rates. We will conduct a quasi-experimental pre and post intervention via an educational session for the medical surgical nurse as well as a retrospective chart review to compare the mortality outcomes of those patients identified as having sepsis.

Data collection is through surveys and retrospective chart reviews. Research questions include: 1. Does the implementation of an evidenced based educational intervention increase medical-surgical nurses’ knowledge of early sepsis identification on post-test when compared with pre-test? 2. “Does the implementation of an evidenced based educational intervention increase the rate of “code rescue” initiation for sepsis intervention at 3 months post education when compared to 3 months pre-education?”, 3. “Does the implementation of an evidence based educational intervention on early sepsis recognition for medical-surgical nurses, decrease the rate of patients with severe sepsis on medical surgical units?”